Tag Archives: art

Thank you 2019

Standard

When I was little, year 2000 seemed stellar years away. And now I say “Hello 2020!”

As I finish this year in my kitchen with crème patissière under my nails, I choose a moment of solitude to write down a few thanks to the passing year.

Thank you 2019,

for my new motherhood experiences. It is a 3D of past, present and future. Kids are unattainable teachers. We just have to open our hearts.

for a magic encounter with a new painter – Conny Famm from Sweden at his “Nordic Grace” exhibition. His “State of soul” is divine.

for my privileged and intimate friendships, which are untouched by distance. You know who are.

for my great professional relationships, which evolved into friendships. You know who you are.

for a new and growing sorority of spirits, regardless of our genders and age. We know who we are.

for many brilliant books I read this year.

for “Angel” by MyiaGi, my song of the year.

for a few small traditions I helped create, which continue to benefit those who need it most.

for my Grandmother’s traditions I sacredly follow on our special family occasions. It is my way to keep her in our hearts. Some of them fill our stomachs just fine, which she also loved doing for us, just like this cheese pie.

for the patience of my hubby when he fights his unspoken “You bought again so many!?, as he knows that I will support all forms of women’s entrepreneurship.

for new wisdoms I discovered and share with my daugthers. Here is a selection of my favourites:

  • The story you tell yourself is by far more important than the story other people tell you.
  • There is no truth in suffering.
  • Patience is a virtue few have, and those who have it gain it all.
  • What others say or do is about them. If you internalise it, you make it about you.
  • There are two basic emotions: fear and faith. The choice is yours.
  • Your behaviours demonstrate your values. Choose what you show to the world.
  • Age does not register with those who are busy with good deeds.
  • People who say that they will do it and then actually do it are rare. Be one of rare ones.

Thank you, 2019! Hello and welcome, 2020!

The Desert of Forbidden Art

Standard

We enjoy freedom to express ourselves. This blog and many others are a testimony. But it has not and in some places is still not a matter of fact.

I came across a new Emmy nominated documentary, The Desert of Forbidden Art. It’s about the Nukus Museum of Art or, in full, The State Art Museum of the Republic of Karakalpakstan (an autonomous area within Uzbekistan), which opened in 1966. Igor Savitsky (1915-84), a Russian born in Kiev, risking denunciation as an “enemy of the people”, sought out and assembled over 40,000 Russian avant-garde and post avant-garde pieces of art and housed them in the Nukus Museum. A trailer can be watched here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pGX7kKrutpY.

Art and culture or just simple acts of humanity are often sources of inspiration that can sustain us in the darkest of circumstances. I remember my grandmother’s story of her father saving centuries old paintings from a temple about to be demolished by infidels. I now own one of those paining as a reminder of sacrifice and devotion to the true self.

about photo: the movie poster for Desert of Forbidden Art which was written, produced, and directed by Amanda Pope and Tchavdar Georgiev. Photo Credit: © Amanda Pope and Tchavdar Georgiev, from http://www.soros.org

Iconic

Standard

I’m not into icons and idols. Yet there are human beings and human deeds that make me want to jump higher, fight harder and live to the fullest.

India (or part of it) is appalled by Sherlyn Chopra – the first Indian to model nude for Playboy magazine. But this is not what drew my attention. It was her words „if total freedom comes with the perceived notion of being a whore, then so be it”.

This is how probably many perceived the Hindu goddess depicted in the nude in one of his paintings by Maqbool Fida Husain, India’s most iconic and prolific artist.

I find him truly iconic as in:

–        Hard working: mastered Arabic calligraphy as a small boy and painted right up until two weeks before his death in London at the age of 95.

–        Convention defying: a nude Hindu goddess for one thing.

–        Bitterness-free: In spite of being dejected by his co-nationals he never showed any resentment towards his homeland. “What has happened with me is a small thing. We remain a free country,” he told an interviewer in 2010.

–        World-beautifying: Left an enduring legacy, while embracing all forms of beauty and colour around him and keeping at heart his essence – India’s streets and culture. Whereever he painted in New York, Paris or Qatar, he remained an Indian artist  (inspired by Sudha G Tilak is a Delhi-based writer on art and culture, http://www.bbc.co.uk)

Whether or not he and his work were regarded as a powerful symbol of India or the World was none of his concern. He just lived his life to the brim.