Tag Archives: learning

“Eleanor Oliphant is completely fine“ by Gail Honeyman

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When I finished the book, I wanted to start reading it again. It delighted my soul. I laughed and I shed a tear, as I traveled in Eleanor’s shoes through her good days and bad days. It’s a good reading for those who believe in empathy and for those who want to give it a try.

The story touches one of the tabu’s in many societies – a mother’s violence against her own children. And the ensuing guilt of the child who tries not to upset her violent mother, even as an adult, even in her own imagination… And all it takes to overcome it – friends, a cat, a good boss and permission to say “enough is enough”.

My favorite line I’ll take with me: “It was such a strange unusual feeling – light, calm, as though I’d swallowed sunshine.”

“Who cooked the last supper? The Women’s History of the world” by Rosalind Miles

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The history is written by winners. We hear that. We repeat it. And what it does it actually mean is often left unspoken.

I always wondered what would we find in history books if they would have been written by a young girl or an elderly, who actually lived through, let’s say, the French Revolution, crusades, Renaissance, wars, inquisition, colonisations, industrialisation and so many other moments of human glory and shame on all continents. Perhaps, the glory we find in history books today would not be that shining. Perhaps, there would be other heroes… Perhaps we would understand differently the world of today…

The book presents a perspective on the role of women in the history of the world from first women gatherers to todays “daughters of time”. It is based on the author’s beliefs system and the research she did.

It was fascinating to discover the stories of many amazing women and their contributions to the development of the world as we know it. We owe so many firsts to so many brave souls.

Some view this book as a work of a feminist, others – as a long-awaited redress for a more balanced history of the humankind. We all find in a book what we already have inside. I have different perceptions on many accounts and this does not diminish the value of the book in my eyes.

As always, read, analyse and think for yourself.

“Good night stories for rebel girls” by Elena Favilli and Francesca Cavalo

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I would recommend it as a good night reading by adults for children. Read it aloud to your child, even if he/she can read.

For me this book is an illustration of leading by example. And I do not see it only for girls. We can all learn from examples of tenacity, courage in face of adversity, faith in good, friendship, perspiration, relentlessness, creativity and many other beautiful manifestations of humanity.

“What I loved” by Siri Hustvedt

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“What I loved” is a work of fiction rooted in research on human behaviour in a variety of disciplines. Leo, the narrator and one of main characters, tells us the story of his family and his closest friend’s family in the decor of the art world of New York.

The human tragedies entangle in seemingly distinct yet interconnected stories. Female and male friendships, the integrity of art dealerships and the father-son relationship will touch any reader’s mind in a sophisticated way, infused with the sadness of human failure to love one another.

“Lost for words” by Stephanie Butland

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“A book is a match in the smoking second between strike and flame” – a marvelous opening line. One can say the same about the human life on Earth.

“Lost for words » is a story of a long path to self-love and empathy. Loveday – the name of the main character – moves in the blink of an eye from a carefree childhood into the world of a child in foster care, as a result of domestic violence.

The story line is nonlinear and the flashbacks are moving as they are narrated through the eyes of a 10 year old caught in a family drama, which keeps reverberating in her adult’s life through the choices she makes. The story ends a bit abruptly to my taste, as if letting you wonder about what’s next. There is a charm in that, I think.